Publishing News Round-Up 1 May 2018

It would be impossible to try cover even a fraction of the publishing news that lands on my e-desk each day, but there’s so much happening in our industry that passes unnoticed. So here’s a selection of some of today’s best publishing stories. Apologies if some are behind pay-walls. Amazon Launches Kids’ (Hardcover) Subscription Service. Read More …

UK Spring First in Series Sale. AU / NZ Mothers Day Price Promo. May Buy 2 Thrillers Get 1 Free Sale. A snapshot of Kobo’s little known Promotions feature for indie authors

On the indie author circuit discussion about how to promote self-published ebooks is prevalent everywhere. Understandably the focus is on Amazon, as the biggest ebook retailer in the US and UK, and of course Amazon famously offers certain promotional features through KDP, such as the ability to list at $0.00 for five days in a Read More …

Kobo and Fnac team up with telco Orange France to expand audiobook and ebook reach

Kobo’s French ebook and audiobook distribution partner Fnac started offering digital comics via the Orange mobile service last year, and this year it adds audiobooks and ebooks to the telco offering. At a time when telcos are struggling to differentiate themselves from one another, being able to offer additional consumer content is one way to Read More …

Storytel Q1 results: Subscribers up 51%, streaming revenue up 43%. Subscribers outside Sweden up 95%

The Swedish audiobook-focussed publisher and distributor Storytel has delivered another quarter of positive results, reporting a total of 577,900 subscribers (across ten countries) at end Q1, an increase of 51% on Q1 2017, and 6,000 above forecast. Streaming revenue, up 43% on Q1 2017, exceeded forecast by SEK 2 million, hitting SEK 222 million($26.5 million). Read More …

Big Bad Wolf Sri Lanka set for June

This is breaking news from Colombo, and I’ll come back with more retails as they emerge. What we know so far is the the first Big Bad Wolf book sale in Colombo last October was a huge success, and this year the event is being brought forward to June. Last year 1.5 million books were Read More …

Flipkart returns to its roots. Plans to challenge Amazon in the India book market. Ebooks next?

Like Amazon, Flipkart started out as an online book retailer. Later it branched into other products, just like Amazon. That shouldn’t come as any big surprise. Flipkart’s founders were both former Amazon employees. But while Amazon has largely maintained its focus on books, despite the publishing sector now being just small part of its overall Read More …

Denmark’s Saxo Premium caters “for all the different ways we read books today”

Denmark’s largest online bookstore Saxo this week launches its new Saxo Premium club, offering deep discounts on print books alongside unlimited access to over 30,000 ebooks and audiobooks. As a Premium member, you can listen freely to audiobooks when you are doing everyday tasks, read e-books on your travels without having to pay extra weight Read More …

China’s unmanned 24/7 bookstores track customer trajectory to offer book recommendations as booklovers move around the store

While we in the west have been enthralled by Amazon’s move into bricks & mortar bookstores and its experimental Amazon Go no-checkouts grocery store, China’s Beijing Publishing Group takes things to a whole new level. The first of 20 planned BPG stores opened inside China’s Beijing International Book City in Tongzhou district, and at just Read More …

Thailand’s Ookbee transitions from ebook store to digital lifestyle platform

Ookbee has come – and gone – a long way since its emergence as Thailand’s primary ebook store in 2011. Today Ookbee’s growing empire spreads across five countries in SE Asia, and after a brief but unsuccessful foray into physical goods with a partnership with Japan’s Transcosmos, Ookbee is now comfortably focused doing what it Read More …

Kindle Snapshot: 8 out of Top 10 ebooks in the Kindle US store are Amazon imprint titles this morning

Probably the single most unforeseen consequence of the digital revolution in publishing was that mainstream publishers would soon be competing not just with countless “indie authors” successfully self-publishing their works, but that mainstream publishers would be directly competing with their biggest retailer. It all seemed so improbable when Amazon started its first imprint back in Read More …