Nordic Council Children’s and YA Literature nominations announced at Bolgna

At the International Children’s Book Fair in Bologna this week the 12 nominations for the Nordic Council’s Children’s & Young People’s Literature Prize were announced. The winner will pocket DKK 350,000 ($58,000) on October 30th at a special ceremony at the Oslo Opera House. The Nordic Council awards a total of five prizes each year Read More …

Storytel Q4 revenue up 27% in Q4. Streaming revenue up 42%. Subscribers up 48% to 533,000. 15 countries by end 2018

While not yet in profit, Storytel has made impressive gains over Q4 2017, with overall revenue up 27% on the period, while streaming revenue rose 47%. CEO Jonas Tellander confirmed total subscribers now at 533,400, in keeping with a TNPS estimate last month. Storytel has 300,000 Swedish subscribers, a further 250,000 beyond and is aiming Read More …

Storytel launches in Iceland. Italy, Bulgaria and Turkey next?

Swedish audiobook subscription service Storytel launched in its tenth country today, adding Iceland to an impressive list of nations that already includes Denmark, Finland, Norway, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Spain and India, as well as Sweden itself. This will come as no surprise to TNPS regulars. As reported here in January – Storytel has 300,000 Swedish subscribers, Read More …

Storytel has 300,000 Swedish subscribers, a further 250,000 beyond and is aiming for thirty countries

The audiobook subscription service Storytel announced this past week that it has surpassed 300,000 paying subscribers in its homeland Sweden, with Swedes listening to almost 100 million hours in 2017, compared with 65 million hours the year before. In November Storytel reported being just below 300,000 with a total of 530,000 subscribers, since when it Read More …

Print sales down 43%. Ebooks sale up 60%. Will the 2017 Christmas Book Flood be good news for Iceland’s publishers?

Come Christmas, and thoughts turn to northern climes. And in Iceland, thoughts turn to books, and the Jólabókaflóð, which monoglots like me will be pleased to know translates to the more  pronounceable Christmas Book Flood. The Christmas Book Flood began in 1944. Iceland had just gained independence from Denmark, and as paper was not rationed Read More …

Iceland exports its authors as a prelude to exporting its books

Who’d be an Icelandic author? With a population of less than half a million and a language pretty much unique to the island, there is of course no significant publishing industry in the country, and very little chance of earning a living as a writer in the home market. Remarkably this hasn’t stopped Iceland having Read More …